Bangladesh

Zamor was born in the Chittagong, Bangladesh. In 1773, when he was 11, he was captured and taken to be sold to the King of France, who gave him to his mistress, Countess du Barry. She christened him Louis-Benoit and liked him a lot. She thought he was African and said he was very mischievous. She educated him, and he was into Rousseau. During the French Revolution, Zamor took the opposing side from his mistress, and joined the Jacobins. He basically was responsible for her eventual execution. However, the revolution soon turned against him as well, so he had to flee the country, not returning until after Napoleon left in 1815. He became a schoolteacher, and died in poverty in 1820 in France. View Larger

Zamor was born in the Chittagong, Bangladesh. In 1773, when he was 11, he was captured and taken to be sold to the King of France, who gave him to his mistress, Countess du Barry. She christened him Louis-Benoit and liked him a lot. She thought he was African and said he was very mischievous. She educated him, and he was into Rousseau. During the French Revolution, Zamor took the opposing side from his mistress, and joined the Jacobins. He basically was responsible for her eventual execution. However, the revolution soon turned against him as well, so he had to flee the country, not returning until after Napoleon left in 1815. He became a schoolteacher, and died in poverty in 1820 in France.


Six months into one of the worst factory disasters in the history of the country, Savar has now become synonymous with the Rana Plaza building collapse, which brought to light the appalling working conditions, little or no workers’ benefits and low wages in the RMG sector.
However, behind the rubble and sordid remnants of the disaster, today there is a change happening which has become a driving force for some of the survivors. 
This driving force is the one-room bag-making factory in a roadside store, which was initiated by a few voluntary rescue workers with an aim to rehabilitate some of the Rana Plaza’s survivors.
The factory, which started four months ago with six machines, has 26 machines and accommodates 20 workers with enough breathing space inside and a healthy working environment.
- See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/labour/2013/oct/23/rana-plaza-survivors-work-self-owned-factory#sthash.AVr8yXgg.9PWhXwiX.dpuf
View Larger

Six months into one of the worst factory disasters in the history of the country, Savar has now become synonymous with the Rana Plaza building collapse, which brought to light the appalling working conditions, little or no workers’ benefits and low wages in the RMG sector.

However, behind the rubble and sordid remnants of the disaster, today there is a change happening which has become a driving force for some of the survivors. 

This driving force is the one-room bag-making factory in a roadside store, which was initiated by a few voluntary rescue workers with an aim to rehabilitate some of the Rana Plaza’s survivors.

The factory, which started four months ago with six machines, has 26 machines and accommodates 20 workers with enough breathing space inside and a healthy working environment.

- See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/labour/2013/oct/23/rana-plaza-survivors-work-self-owned-factory#sthash.AVr8yXgg.9PWhXwiX.dpuf


Mahmuda Begum, assistant commissioner of Chittagong Metropolitan Police (CPM), was the first female officer in Bangladesh as well as in the sub-continent who got Special Weapon and Tactics training provided by the USA. She has completed the 42-day-long training as a member of Crisis Response Team of Swat from May 28 to July 5. View Larger

Mahmuda Begum, assistant commissioner of Chittagong Metropolitan Police (CPM), was the first female officer in Bangladesh as well as in the sub-continent who got Special Weapon and Tactics training provided by the USA. She has completed the 42-day-long training as a member of Crisis Response Team of Swat from May 28 to July 5.


Dhaka’s pop culture following is not big, but it is not new either. Starting from teenagers to veteran entrepreneurs, there are collectors and ardent followers of movies, comics and video games spread across the capital. Samdani Art Foundation made a wonderful initiative to bring all of them under one roof, and for two days recently, the Bench cafe in Gulshan bustled as youth from all around poured in to be a part of the first Dhaka Comicon.
Comicon, short for Comic Convention, is a common happening in the western world, where collectors of comics, action figures and souvenirs come together to celebrate their passion. Dhaka Comicon, although rather small in scale, was at no shortage of that enthusiasm and colours. One of the most striking features of comicons across the world, cosplay — or dressing up as characters from movies, comics and video games — was also aplenty.
Scores came dressed up at the festival, ranging from the very familiar Batman to the more hardcore zombie character Hunter from the video game “Left4Dead”. Alfred D’ Silva, who came in the gruesome make-up of a zombie and bandages on his leg, termed the festival “a huge leap” for the fans of movies and video games, and strongly hoped that the festival would get bigger every year. Puly, dressed up as Rogue from the “X-Men” comics, said there is a super-hero in everyone, and it felt good to be dressed as one.
A number of collectors also put their possessions on display, ranging from action figures of the video game “God of War” to miniature batsignals (from the “Batman” comics and movies). One of the collectors, Salman, said that he has been collecting G.I. Joe action figures for 15 years, and was excited about displaying his prized collection.
The festival also had a fan-art competition, a traders’ corner, live cartoon and caricature drawing, souvenir sales and a concert.
(Source)

Dhaka’s pop culture following is not big, but it is not new either. Starting from teenagers to veteran entrepreneurs, there are collectors and ardent followers of movies, comics and video games spread across the capital. Samdani Art Foundation made a wonderful initiative to bring all of them under one roof, and for two days recently, the Bench cafe in Gulshan bustled as youth from all around poured in to be a part of the first Dhaka Comicon.

Comicon, short for Comic Convention, is a common happening in the western world, where collectors of comics, action figures and souvenirs come together to celebrate their passion. Dhaka Comicon, although rather small in scale, was at no shortage of that enthusiasm and colours. One of the most striking features of comicons across the world, cosplay — or dressing up as characters from movies, comics and video games — was also aplenty.

Scores came dressed up at the festival, ranging from the very familiar Batman to the more hardcore zombie character Hunter from the video game “Left4Dead”. Alfred D’ Silva, who came in the gruesome make-up of a zombie and bandages on his leg, termed the festival “a huge leap” for the fans of movies and video games, and strongly hoped that the festival would get bigger every year. Puly, dressed up as Rogue from the “X-Men” comics, said there is a super-hero in everyone, and it felt good to be dressed as one.

A number of collectors also put their possessions on display, ranging from action figures of the video game “God of War” to miniature batsignals (from the “Batman” comics and movies). One of the collectors, Salman, said that he has been collecting G.I. Joe action figures for 15 years, and was excited about displaying his prized collection.

The festival also had a fan-art competition, a traders’ corner, live cartoon and caricature drawing, souvenir sales and a concert.

(Source)


southasianhistory:

 The Acid Survival Foundation looks after women attacked by criminal jets of acid. An older woman cares for her granddaughter. Photo: Abbas

Acid Survivors Foundation (ASF) has been working on acid violence issues since 1999. The ultimate goal of the organization is to eliminate acid violence from Bangladesh. However, at present there is an acid attack every two days. Victims of acid violence need physical reconstruction, support for reintegration into mainstream society and legal assistance. Therefore, ASF ensures the best possible medical, legal and social reintegration support to the acid survivors.
ASF’s focus is on its work as a coordinating agency. Thus, building up the capacity of the local level NGOs as well as the professionals involved with this issue, for example, doctors, public prosecutors and the police, is a very important part of ASF’s activities. ASF also has initiatives to engage the media, celebrities and students in implementation of prevention activities.
ASF has gained national and international recognition for its dedicated support to the acid survivors. In appreciation of ASF’s success, the Executive Director of the organization received the 4th Human Rights Award of Amnesty International – Germany in 2005. ASF is the pioneer and dedicatedly working specifically with the acid violence issues in Bangladesh; thus a role model for other countries having acid violence dilemma.
Acid violence is a particularly vicious and damaging form of violence in Bangladesh where acid is thrown in people’s faces. The overwhelming majority of the victims are women, and many of them are below 18 years of age. The victims are attacked for many reasons. In some cases it is because a young girl or women has spurned the sexual advances of a male or either she or her parents have rejected a proposal of marriage. Recently, however, there have been acid attacks on children, older women and also men. These attacks are often the result of family and land dispute, dowry demands or a desire for revenge.
Nitric or sulphuric acid has a catastrophic effect on human flesh. It causes the skin tissue to melt, often exposing the bones below the flesh, sometimes even dissolving the bone. When acid attacks the eyes, it damages them permanently. Many acid attacks survivors have lost the use of one or both eyes.
But the scars left by acid are not just skin deep. In addition to the inevitable psychological trauma, some survivors also face social isolation and ostracism that further damage their self-esteem and seriously undermine their professional and personal futures. Women who have survived acid attacks have great difficulty in finding work and, if unmarried (as many victims tend to be), have very little chance of ever getting married. In a country like Bangladesh this has serious social and economic consequences.
More about the ASF

View Larger

southasianhistory:

 The Acid Survival Foundation looks after women attacked by criminal jets of acid. An older woman cares for her granddaughter. Photo: Abbas

Acid Survivors Foundation (ASF) has been working on acid violence issues since 1999. The ultimate goal of the organization is to eliminate acid violence from Bangladesh. However, at present there is an acid attack every two days. Victims of acid violence need physical reconstruction, support for reintegration into mainstream society and legal assistance. Therefore, ASF ensures the best possible medical, legal and social reintegration support to the acid survivors.

ASF’s focus is on its work as a coordinating agency. Thus, building up the capacity of the local level NGOs as well as the professionals involved with this issue, for example, doctors, public prosecutors and the police, is a very important part of ASF’s activities. ASF also has initiatives to engage the media, celebrities and students in implementation of prevention activities.

ASF has gained national and international recognition for its dedicated support to the acid survivors. In appreciation of ASF’s success, the Executive Director of the organization received the 4th Human Rights Award of Amnesty International – Germany in 2005. ASF is the pioneer and dedicatedly working specifically with the acid violence issues in Bangladesh; thus a role model for other countries having acid violence dilemma.

Acid violence is a particularly vicious and damaging form of violence in Bangladesh where acid is thrown in people’s faces. The overwhelming majority of the victims are women, and many of them are below 18 years of age. The victims are attacked for many reasons. In some cases it is because a young girl or women has spurned the sexual advances of a male or either she or her parents have rejected a proposal of marriage. Recently, however, there have been acid attacks on children, older women and also men. These attacks are often the result of family and land dispute, dowry demands or a desire for revenge.

Nitric or sulphuric acid has a catastrophic effect on human flesh. It causes the skin tissue to melt, often exposing the bones below the flesh, sometimes even dissolving the bone. When acid attacks the eyes, it damages them permanently. Many acid attacks survivors have lost the use of one or both eyes.

But the scars left by acid are not just skin deep. In addition to the inevitable psychological trauma, some survivors also face social isolation and ostracism that further damage their self-esteem and seriously undermine their professional and personal futures. Women who have survived acid attacks have great difficulty in finding work and, if unmarried (as many victims tend to be), have very little chance of ever getting married. In a country like Bangladesh this has serious social and economic consequences.

More about the ASF

(Source: )


Bangladesh textile factory fire leaves more than 100 dead | World news | The Guardian →

Rooms full of female workers were cut off as piles of yarn and fabric filling corridors ignited. Reports also suggested fire exits at the site had locks on, which had to be broken in order for staff to escape.

“It was 6.45pm when the fire alarm was raised. I rushed out. I heard that [grills blocking the way to] the second and third floors were locked. When I came down, I saw fire at both the stairways that the ladies used. I still have not found any trace of my sister-in-law,” Alam told the Guardian.

According to Zakir Hossain, another worker, management told their employees not to evacuate immediately.

“The office staff asked us to stay where we were, telling us not to panic. We did not listen to them and started moving out,” Hossain recalled. “A lot of people were stuck there. Some people got out climbing down the bamboo [scaffolding] tied against the building.”

Witnesses said many workers leapt from upper stories in a bid to escape the flames. Twelve workers died in hospital from injuries sustained in falls, officials said, bringing the overall toll to 123 dead and more than 150 injured.